An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia

By Jane Donahue Eberwein | Go to book overview

L

LATIN AMERICAN RESPONSES TO DICKINSON With the exception of George Monteiro's detailed survey of translations and criticism in Portuguese, the bibliography on Latin American responses to Dickinson is far from complete. Even so, there is reason to believe that an ample public in Latin America has read her work, primarily in translation. Among writers fluent in English who have indicated respect for Emily Dickinson's work, Mexican poet Octavio Paz used the prologue to the English version of his book on Sor Juana to mention Dickinson as one of five great women writers of the Western Hemisphere. Chilean Nobel laureate Gabriela Mistral annotated all of the Emily Dickinson poems in her personal copy of the Spanish-language edition of Allen Tate and John Peale Bishop's anthology of U.S. poetry. There are good reasons to think that contemporary poets, the Nicaraguan Ernesto Cardenal and Chilean Nicanor Parra (both intensely engaged with U.S. literature), respond to Dickinson: their writing shares Dickinson's epigrammatic and often comic style, engagement with religious* themes, and concern with New World locales. Among women writers, Silvina Ocampo, Argentine writer of fantastic short stories and herself a famous semirecluse, and the contemporary Chilean-U.S. poet Marjorie Agosin have read and been influenced by Dickinson's work, which shares their fascination with the contradictions of gender identity.

Probable influence aside, actual translations into Spanish and Portuguese provide the most reliable index to Dickinson's reputation in Latin America. Such translations, only sporadically noted in bibliographies, most often appear in widely circulating, somewhat ephemeral forms of magazines and newspaper literary supplements. The popularity and respectability of literature in translation have enabled many major writers to earn part of their living as translators. Such was the case with Juan Ramón Jiménez, a key Spanish poet who relocated to Puerto Rico after the Spanish civil war. Jiménez produced the earliest known

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An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chronology xv
  • Abbreviations xix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 38
  • D 61
  • E 92
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 131
  • I 154
  • J 162
  • K 169
  • L 171
  • M 188
  • N 205
  • O 218
  • P 222
  • R 243
  • S 256
  • T 279
  • U 294
  • V 296
  • W 301
  • Y 311
  • Appendix A - Fascicle Listings of Dickinson Poems 313
  • Appendix B - Major Archival Collections for Dickinson Research 339
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index of Poems Cited 361
  • General Index 371
  • About the Contributors 387
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