An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia

By Jane Donahue Eberwein | Go to book overview

Index of Poems Cited
Poems are listed in Thomas H. Johnson's numerical order (roughly chronological) for ease of identifying those cited within the text only by number. Complete listings of all 1,775 titles, alphabetically arranged, may be found at the back of Johnson's editions of The Poems of Emily Dickinson and The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Bold type indicates a separate entry on this poem. For further insight into these and other Dickinson poems, readers should consult Joseph Duchac's The Poems of Emily Dickinson: An Annotated Guide to Commentary Published in English, the first volume of which covers criticism of particular poems from 1890-1977, while the second covers 1978-1989.
1 Awake ye muses nine, sing me a strain divine, 29, 296, 291
3 Sic transit gloria mundi,148, 152, 240, 265, 270, 296-97, 289
5 I have a Bird in spring, 22, 174
8 There is a word, 310
9 Through lane it lay -- thro' bramble --, 51
14 One Sister have I in our house, 266
15 The Guest is gold and crimson --, 288
17 Baffled for just a day or two --, 122
18 The Gentian weaves her fringes --, 210
19 A sepal, petal, and a thorn, 40
21 We lose -- because we win --, 262
22 All these my banners be, 260
23 I had a guinea golden --, 119
34 Garlands for Queens, may be --, 210
35 Nobody knows this little Rose --,31, 210, 240, 270, 289
36 I counted till they danced so, 288
39 It did not surprise me --, 174
43 Could live -- did live --, 107
49 I never lost as much but twice, 126

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An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chronology xv
  • Abbreviations xix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 38
  • D 61
  • E 92
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 131
  • I 154
  • J 162
  • K 169
  • L 171
  • M 188
  • N 205
  • O 218
  • P 222
  • R 243
  • S 256
  • T 279
  • U 294
  • V 296
  • W 301
  • Y 311
  • Appendix A - Fascicle Listings of Dickinson Poems 313
  • Appendix B - Major Archival Collections for Dickinson Research 339
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index of Poems Cited 361
  • General Index 371
  • About the Contributors 387
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