The United States, the European Union, and the "Globalization" of World Trade: Allies or Adversaries?

By Thomas C. Fischer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

So many people have influenced this book--from pub patrons in English villages to a cab driver in Canberra--that I could not possibly thank them all. They know who they are, and what their contributions were, and how grateful I am for them. I hope this knowledge will suffice.

However, some persons have figured so prominently in the project that they deserve to be thanked individually. I begin with Terence Daintith, former Director of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies at the University of London (and now Dean of its Schools of Advanced Studies), and his successor as Institute Director, Barry A. K. Rider, of Jesus College, Cambridge. They had enough faith in my work to steer me into an Inns of Court Fellowship, where serious work on the book began. While I was resident at Lincoln's Inn, Treasurer Sir Maurice Drake, DFC; Under Treasurer Malcolm Carver; my "shepherd," Christopher McCall, QC; and the Inn librarian, Guy Holborn (and that of Middle Temple, Janet Edgell), did all in their power to accommodate and advance my work. Other exceptionally welcoming members of the Inn were Paul Heim, former Registrar of the European Court of Justice, David Lord Renton and Sir Robert "Ted" Megarry, to mention just a few.

Elsewhere in London I enjoyed the assistance of David Vaughan, QC, barrister of Brick Court Chambers, and his young colleague, Aidan Robertson; Peter Goldsmith, QC, of Fountain Court, Temple; Kate Timms, head of the U.K. Ministry of Agriculture, Fish and Food (MAFF); Clare Ede, Librarian of the EU Mission to London; Sir Raymond Whitney, OBE, and the Rt. Hon. David Heathcoat-Amory of the House of Commons; Baroness Elles (formerly a Member of the European Parliament); and Lords Wallace of Saltaire and Slynn of Hadley, who gave quite different perspec-

-xiii-

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