Succeeding in an Academic Career: A Guide for Faculty of Color

By Mildred García | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Weighing the Options: Where
Do I Want to Work?

Mildred García

As more people of color enter higher education, many are considering entering or are entering the professoriate. Visualizing education as the key to advancement in a global world and to active citizenship in a pluralistic society, many of us view education as the way we can help others reach their potential, assist in discovering and applying knowledge, and bring perspectives which would otherwise be excluded. However, when considering our role as faculty members, we often hesitate to factor in where our talents will best be utilized and most validated.

Many of us tend to envision ourselves in environments that reflect a "comfort zone." Some of us see those faculty members--our mentors-- who guided us through our doctorates as models of being where we should be. Our imaginations may even place us in the institutions where we first taught, served as graduate students, or received our terminal degree. While these are certainly valid--even optimal--choices for some, I would argue that many of us are reluctant to approach the choice in terms of seeking an environment that best utilizes our talents in the service of our own goals and ambitions, the institution, and the students. At a time when many institutions are seeing record retirements and information technology is transforming the role of the faculty, contemplating future roles and rewards is a prerequisite to accepting a faculty position.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in an Academic Career: A Guide for Faculty of Color
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.