A New History of Educational Philosophy

By James S. Kaminsky | Go to book overview

8
The Counterculture and Modern Times

Philosophy's public image in the immediate postwar period was saved by existentialism. Existentialism in its various formulations represented philosophy's resurgent humanism (see Schrader, 1967) in a world that had seen enough manifestations of German philosophy in Hitler's Fascism and Stalin's Gulags. Philosophy's academic image was saved by Wittgenstein's version of metaphysics, epistemology, and analysis. Obsessed with analysis, departments of philosophy in England ignored the continental tradition in favor of a closer identification with analysis and therein the ethos of science. The time marked the genesis of a new philosophical age--an age of analysis ( Rorty, 1982, 214-230). The age was as varied as the numerous versions of analyses it generated. Versions varied from those that depended on Russell's theory of descriptions to those that revolved around constructive reformulations of concepts ( Tice and Slavens, 1983, 164- 165). The similarity with educational philosophy was a methodological similarity. The reservoirs of questions that defined each of the disciplines were different and their natural audiences were radically divergent. Nevertheless, analytic philosophy began as a way of divesting philosophy of its speculative image and endowing it with the virtues of science by the means of "logical analysis" ( Rorty, 1982, 227).

Prior to World War I what counted most as academic philosophy was developed domestically by Bertrand Russell, Alfred North Whitehead, and G. E. Moore. The students of Russell, Moore, and their colleagues were appointed to, and soon dominated, England's most prestigious departments of philosophy. Together they dictated what would and would not count as philosophy ( McGuinness, 1988). The work

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A New History of Educational Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions to the Study of Education ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxiv
  • Part I - Philosophy of Education in the United States 1
  • 1 - The 1890s Social Reform Movement in the United States 3
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Intellectual Antecedents 19
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - The Professional Embodiment of Education 49
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - Philosophy of Education After 1945 77
  • Notes 96
  • 5 - Conclusion: The United States 99
  • Part II - Philosophy of Education in Great Britain 103
  • 6 - Genesis 105
  • Notes 141
  • 7 - Education for All 145
  • Notes 173
  • 8 - The Counterculture and Modern Times 175
  • Notes 187
  • 9 - Conclusion: Great Britain 189
  • Notes 192
  • Part III - Philosophy of Education in Australia 193
  • 10 - The Early Days in Australia 195
  • Notes 203
  • 11 - John Anderson and C. D. Hardie 205
  • Notes 213
  • 12 - The Right Climate, Australia and New Zealand 215
  • Notes 224
  • 13 - Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia 225
  • Notes 245
  • 14 - Conclusion: Australasia 247
  • Bibliography 251
  • Index 271
  • About the Author 279
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