A New History of Educational Philosophy

By James S. Kaminsky | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The percentage of teachers working in State secondary schools who were university graduates fell from 84.6 percent in 1944 to only 41.5 percent in 1966 ( Barcan, 1980, 302).
2.
New Zealand teachers taught on average 30 or 31 periods during a 35 period week.
3.
At this point in the text there should be a separate history of specific social factors attached to the establishment of philosophy of education in New Zealand. There are significant differences in the national ethos of philosophy of education in New Zealand, but I do not have the research resources to provide that history here. All I can do is apologize to my colleagues in New Zealand. As it stands, this history overemphasizes Australia in a history that clearly should be focused upon Australasia--Australia and New Zealand.

One further aside, the original charter of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia included members from Australia, New Zealand, and New Guinea. But the element of the society that was based in Port Moresby never evolved into a significant segment of the society.

4.
The liberal agenda never found enduring support even among liberals themselves. Only a few years later Karmel, in Quality of education in Australia ( 1985), revised his opinion on the primacy of equality of educational opportunity in favor of a new and more conservative focus upon "equal outcomes."

-224-

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A New History of Educational Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions to the Study of Education ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxiv
  • Part I - Philosophy of Education in the United States 1
  • 1 - The 1890s Social Reform Movement in the United States 3
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Intellectual Antecedents 19
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - The Professional Embodiment of Education 49
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - Philosophy of Education After 1945 77
  • Notes 96
  • 5 - Conclusion: The United States 99
  • Part II - Philosophy of Education in Great Britain 103
  • 6 - Genesis 105
  • Notes 141
  • 7 - Education for All 145
  • Notes 173
  • 8 - The Counterculture and Modern Times 175
  • Notes 187
  • 9 - Conclusion: Great Britain 189
  • Notes 192
  • Part III - Philosophy of Education in Australia 193
  • 10 - The Early Days in Australia 195
  • Notes 203
  • 11 - John Anderson and C. D. Hardie 205
  • Notes 213
  • 12 - The Right Climate, Australia and New Zealand 215
  • Notes 224
  • 13 - Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia 225
  • Notes 245
  • 14 - Conclusion: Australasia 247
  • Bibliography 251
  • Index 271
  • About the Author 279
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