Workforce Readiness: Competencies and Assessment

By Harold F. O'Neil Jr. | Go to book overview

TABLE 8.12
Workforce Readiness Assessment Methodology for SCANS: Example 2

General MethodologySpecific Example


Select a work environment Analytically derived
Conduct job and task analysis Analytically derived
Select competency Interpersonal Competency
( SCANS)
Conduct componential analysis of competency Negotiates
Specify basic skills foundation Thinking creatively, making
decisions, solving problems
Create indicator(s) for subcompetency requirement Articulating common goals,
understanding others'
positions, creating
integrative solutions
Classify indicator(s) within a cognitive science taxonomy Integrative negotiation
(Womack, 1990)
Create rapid prototype of measures of indicator(s) via [see examples in Tables 8.11]
test specifications8.11]
Select/develop final measures of indicator(s) To be done
Select experimental/analytical design Criterion groups
Run empirical studies To be done
Analyze statistically To be done
Use/create norms To be done
Report reliability/validity of indicator(s) measure To be done
Report on workforce readiness using multiple indicators To be done


WHERE ARE WE NOW?

We have created a good "first cut" of a general methodology for measuring workforce readiness competencies. Further, we have instantiated this methodology with two prototypic examples. Our plans are to explore the use of technology to administer, score, and interpret our workforce readiness competency measures. Such explorations are documented in chapters by O'Neil, Allred, and Dennis (this volume) and O'Neil, Chung, and Brown (this volume).


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The work reported herein was supported under the Educational Research and Development Center Program cooperative agreement R117GIO027 and CFDA catalog number 84.117G as administered by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education. The findings and opinions expressed in this report do not reflect the position or policies of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement or the U.S. Department of Education.

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