Workforce Readiness: Competencies and Assessment

By Harold F. O'Neil Jr. | Go to book overview

First, in terms of skills in proposing and examining possible options, a negotiator must assess possible options with respect to both the negotiator's own interests and the other party's interests, and must do so for both distributive and integrative aspects of the negotiation. With respect to distributive aspects, does an option provide outcomes that are acceptable to both the negotiator and the other party? With respect to integrative aspects, are there options that increase the outcomes for both parties?

Second, in terms of skills in making reasonable compromises, the literature suggests that a negotiator must consider compromises in terms of the other party's and his or her own interests along both the distributive and integrative dimensions. According to the distributive aspects of reasonable compromises, a party must not compromise his or her own outcomes unduly, while making enough of a compromise to make a resolution acceptable to the other party. With respect to the integrative aspect of making reasonable compromises, a reasonable compromise is one that gives up some of one's outcomes for the sake of the other's only where it is not possible to provide a corresponding increase to the other side without giving up on the outcomes one receives him- or herself. In other words, a compromise is not reasonable where the outcomes offered to the other side can somehow be provided without sacrificing one's own outcomes.

Most importantly, the results of our validation study suggest that our simulation can be used to measure these research-identified indicators of negotiation performance in proposing and examining options and making reasonable proposals. The computer simulation approach to measuring negotiation skills appears to be worthy of further investigation. Further exploration along this avenue of assessment holds the promise of yielding an assessment method for other SCANS skills that can assist the United States in its endeavor to develop a workforce with the skills needed to compete successfully in today's world.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The work reported herein was supported under the Educational Research and Development Center Program cooperative agreement R117G20027 and CFDA catalog number 84.117G as administered by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education. The findings and opinions expressed in this report do not reflect the position or policies of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement or the U.S. Department of Education.


REFERENCES

Blake R. R., & Mouton J. S. ( 1979). Intergroup problem solving in organization: From theory to practice. In W. G. Austin & S. Worchel (Eds.), The social pffchology of intergroup relations. Monterey, CA: Brooks/Cole.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Workforce Readiness: Competencies and Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 467

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.