Workforce Readiness: Competencies and Assessment

By Harold F. O'Neil Jr. | Go to book overview

degree to which the absence of known cognitive biases with performance implications is associated with higher negotiation performance on our simulation. Although not as robust as the expert/novice findings, we have consistently found that (a) such biases are associated with lower negotiation performance in the simulation, and (b) experts exhibit more self-regulation skills than novices.

Several other properties of the negotiation simulation as an assessment tool have also been examined. It appears that the simulation is promising in various negotiation scenarios. Specifically, in two scenarios of negotiating a job contract, whether as a high school student with a movie theater manager or as a law student for ajob with a law firm, subject performance on the simulation did not vary significantly as a function of scenario. In effect, we may have parallel forms of our test.

We plan to continue to measure self-regulation for both individuals and teams. However, our current performance measures do not capture the group process well. Our major new effort will be to develop domain-independent measures of teamwork skills so that a score can be assigned to an individual as well as to a team. This work is documented in O'Neil, Chung, and Brown (chapter 16, this book). In summary, our experience in conducting these studies suggests that the simulation approach we have taken is a valid and feasible method of assessing negotiation skills for both individuals and teams.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors would like to thank Dr. Randy Lowry, Dr. Cheryl McDonald, and Dr. Peter Robinson of the Institute for Alternative Dispute Resolution, Pepperdine University, for their assistance. We also wish to thank the principal, students and teachers at Twin Falls High School, Twin Falls, ID, for their assistance.

The work reported herein was supported under the Educational Research and Development Center Program cooperative agreement R117G10027 and CFDA catalog number 84.117G as administered by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education. The findings and opinions expressed in this report do not reflect the position or policies of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement or the U.S. Department of Education.


REFERENCES

Baker E. L. ( 1992, February). The role of domain specifications in improving the technical quality of performance assessment (Project 2.2, Final Deliverable to OERI). Los Angeles: University of California, Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing.

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Workforce Readiness: Competencies and Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 467

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.