Language and Politics in the United States and Canada: Myths and Realities

By Thomas Ricento; Barbara Burnaby | Go to book overview

the courts have generally not found a right to use one's primary language in the workplace or a right to receive translations other than those specified by legislation. It is noteworthy, however, that in attempting to delineate the rights of language minorities the courts so far have not found the Official English Declaration to be significant.


REFERENCES

Adams K., & Brink D. (Eds.). ( 1990). Perspectives on official English. New York: Mouton de Gruyter.

American Civil Liberties Union. ( 1992). "Bilingual public services in California". In J. Crawford (Ed.), Language loyalties (pp. 303-311). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Chen E. M. ( 1992). "Language rights in the private sector". In J. Crawford (Ed.), Language loyalties (pp. 269-277). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Crawford J. (Ed.). ( 1992). Language loyalties. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hall T. M. ( 1991). "When does adverse employment decision based on person's foreign accent constitute national origin discrimination in violation of Title VII of Civil Rights Act of 1964". American Law Reports Federal, 104, 816-856.

McLeod, R. G. ( 1993, April 28). "Census finds many speak foreign language at home". San Francisco Chronicle, p. A3.

"Official English: Federal limits on efforts to curtail bilingual services in the states". ( 1987). Harvard Law Review, 100, 1345-1362.

Piatt B. ( 1992). "The confusing state of minority language rights". In J. Crawford (Ed.), Language loyalties (pp. 228-234). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Ruiz R. ( 1990). "Official languages and language planning". In K. Adams & D. Brink (Eds.), Perspectives on official English (pp. 11-24). New York: Mouton de Gruyter.

Thomas T. A. ( 1988). "Requirement that employees speak English in workplace as discrimination in employment under Title VII of Civil Rights Act of 1964". American Law Reports Federal, 90, 806-812.

Zall B. W., & Stein S. M. ( 1990). "Legal background and history of the English language movement". In K. Adams & D. Brink (Eds.), Perspectives on official English (pp. 261-271). New York: Mouton de Gruyter.

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