Language and Politics in the United States and Canada: Myths and Realities

By Thomas Ricento; Barbara Burnaby | Go to book overview

V
Focus on Context

The kinds of policies discussed in this book are, when all is said and done, only the statements and actions of governments. They exist in contexts where many other forces make their own statements and take their own actions. The focus of Part V is on the iterative impacts that individuals and groups on the one hand and governments on the other have on each other where action on language is concerned. Such discussions really cut governments down to size in terms of their actual effectiveness, at least where regulating language is concerned. Even where governments can be shown to have had a devastating effect on specific languages and their use (see, e.g., Crawford, chapter 6, this volume), such effects would not have been possible if it were not the case that public opinion in the majority population was generally at least as racist as the policies themselves (see also Wiley, chapter 9, this volume). Thus, it is essential in a book on language policy to attend to the reactions and interactions of various stakeholders as well as to the ideals stated in the policies themselves.

Because language has a pervasive influence on virtually all aspects of human life, the authors of chapters in this section (and elsewhere in the book) raise a broad range of matters in discussing the effects of language policy. For example, in chapter 11 Cartwright shows that, even in our age of almost limitless communication across distances, geography can play an important role in the implementation of language policies. The "border lands" between the concentration of francophones in Quebec and that of anglophones in the rest of Canada have been the site of a high proportion of the struggle after the declaration of the Official Languages Act. (See also Crawford's chapter for a discussion of the effect of the reservation system on indigenous languages.)

-269-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Language and Politics in the United States and Canada: Myths and Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 357

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.