Reducing Prejudice and Discrimination

By Stuart Oskamp | Go to book overview
Subject Index
Acceptance, process of, 245-248
Accessibility bias, 79
Activation of stereotypes. See Stereotypes
Activism, 229. See also Collective action
Affirmative action, 77-78, 197-198
beneficiaries of, 34-35
Aggression, 52-53, 63-65
Ambivalence, 221-222, 226, 229-230
Anger, 198-200, 203-205
Anxiety: intergroup, 27-28
Applications of research, 14-16
Appraisals: cognitive, 213-215 of prejudice, 214-215, 222
Arbitrary-set hierarchies, 48-54, 65
Assimilation, 10, 154-155, 157, 168, 224, 301
Attention. See Social cognition Attitudes:
explicit, 140
implicit, 139, 141
liking, 119, 130, 252, 257-258
Mexicans', toward Americans, 32-34
racial, 23, 83-86, 187, 320
toward affirmative action, 34-35, 199
toward immigrants, 28-30, 36
toward outgroups, 27-28
toward refugees, 35-36
women's, toward men, 30-32
Attributions, 78-80. See also Social cognition
ispositional, 119-120, 123-124
Automatic processes, 188, 192, 218
Automobile sales, 62
Aversive racism. See Racism
Backlash, 193-201, 205
Balance, cognitive, 170
Bigots, 229-230
Bilingual education, 274-277
(American Spanish-English, 276-277
Canadian French immersion, 275-276
Black population. See Population share
Bystander helping, 286-287
Civic values, 262-264, 266
taught by daily activities, 263-264
Cognitive development theory, 271
Collective action, 228-229, 232
Common ingroup identity model, 148-153, 300-302, 304-312, 314-316
Communication, 246
Community race-related programs, 321-324
awards or publicity, 328, 331
characteristics of, 325
evaluation of outcomes, 327-328, 331, 334
expansion to other cities, 328-329
in-depth study of, 333-334
methods or mechanisms used by, 325- 326, 329, 331-332
other goals, 327
prejudice reduction goal, 326-327, 330- 333
Competition, 127-128, 241, 249-250
intergroup, 251-252
Complexity, cognitive, 177-180
Conflict, 252-262
of interest, 256
resolution, 255-262, 266
Consistency, cognitive, 201, 204-205
Contact:
favorable conditions, 32-34, 93-94, 108, 271-272, 276, 295, 329, 332
hypothesis, 8-9, 93-94, 147, 151-152, 165, 288, 295
in neighborhood, 314-316
in schools, 271-274, 276, 303, 305-312, 314-316
individual versus aggregate, 297
intergroup, 7, 32-34, 38, 93-112, 147, 155-158, 167, 178, 239, 244, 271, 297, 301, 329-333

-349-

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