Handbook of Psychology and Health: Cardiovascular Disorders and Behavior - Vol. 3

By David S. Krantz; Andrew Baum et al. | Go to book overview

failure on the initially challenging task induced a generalized perception of helplessness yielding the observed performance decrement. Although any choice between interpretations would be premature, a capacity allocation interpretation seems more consistent with other aspects of Type A behavior than the learned helplessness concept. Note also that a personality concept such as control may be expressed through the differences in allocation policy between As and Bs. A variety of psychosocial factors may conceivably be integrated through their common effects on the chronicity and intensity of allocations of processing capacity.

In conclusion, we have reviewed evidence which establishes the possibility that attention, defined in processing capacity terms here, is related to CHD. Although further research is clearly required, existing evidence suggests that this will be fruitful. Hopefully, attending to attention will allow us to better understand the role of psychological factors in heart disease.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to thank Dr. Karen A. Matthews for her substantial contribution to this chapter. Dr. Matthews is largely responsible for developing the relationship between attention and buffers against disease which is discussed in the chapter. Dr. Kay A. Jennings and Dr. Matthews are both thanked for helpful critiques of various drafts of the chapter.


REFERENCES

Abrahams J. P. "Psychomotor performance and change in cardiac rate in subjects behaviorally predisposed to coronary heart disease" (Doctoral dissertation, University of Southern California, 1974). Dissertation Abstracts International, 19745, 35/04B, 1931.

Abrahams J. P., & Birren J. E. "Reaction time as a function of age and behavioral predisposition to coronary heart disease". Journal of Gerontology, 19735, 28,471-478.

Averill J. R. "An analysis of psychophysiological symbolism and its influence on theories of emotion". Journal for the Theory of Social Behavior, 19745, 4,147-190.

Baum A., & Valins S. (Eds.). The social psychology of crowding: Studies of the effects of residential group size. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1977.

Berkowitz L. "Social norms, feelings, and other factors affecting helping and altruism". In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology, 19725, 6,63-108.

Bernstein A. S., & Taylor K. W. "The interaction of stimulus information with potential stimulus significance in eliciting the skin conductance orienting response". In H. D. Kimmel, E. H. van Olst , & J. H. Orlebeke (Eds.), The orienting reflex in humans. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1979, pp. 499-52.

Bohlin G., & Graham F. K. "Cardiac deceleration and reflex blink facilitation". Psychophysiology, 19775, 14,423-430.

Bohlin G., & Kjellberg A. "Orienting activity in two-stimulus paradigms as reflected in heart rate". In H. D. Kimmel, E. van Olst, & J. F. Orlebeke (Eds.), The orienting reflex in humans. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1979, pp. 169-189.

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Handbook of Psychology and Health: Cardiovascular Disorders and Behavior - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Handbook of Psychology and Health *
  • 1 - Behavior and Cardiovascular Disease: Issues and Overview 1
  • References 14
  • 2 - Animal Behavior Models of Coronary Heart Disease 19
  • References 50
  • 3 - Perspectives on Coronary-Prone Behavior 57
  • Acknowledgments 77
  • References 77
  • 4 - Attention and Coronary Heart Disease 85
  • Acknowledgments 116
  • References 116
  • 5 - Psychological Factors in Cardiac Arrhythmias and Sudden Death 125
  • Acknowledgments 150
  • References 150
  • 6 - Animal Models of Hypertension 155
  • References 189
  • 7 - Behavioral-Cardiac Interactions in Hypertension 199
  • ACKNOWLDEGMENTS 226
  • References 226
  • 8 - Modification of Coronary-Risk Behavior 231
  • Acknowledgments 270
  • References 270
  • 9 - The Non-Pharmacologic Treatment of Hypertension 277
  • References 291
  • 10 - Recovery and Rehabilitation of Heart Patients: Psychosocial Aspects 295
  • References 328
  • Author Index 335
  • Subject Index 355
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