Handbook of Psychology and Health: Cardiovascular Disorders and Behavior - Vol. 3

By David S. Krantz; Andrew Baum et al. | Go to book overview

10
Recovery and Rehabilitation of Heart Patients: Psychosocial Aspects

Sydney H. Croog University of Connecticut Health Center

My heart attack of 1955 seemed well behind me, but I was conscious that it was part of the background of my life -- just as I was conscious of my family's history of stroke and heart disease. I did not fear death so much as I feared disability. Whenever I walked through the Red Room and saw the portrait of Woodrow Wilson hanging there, I thought of him stretched out upstairs in the White House, powerless to move, with the machinery of the American Government in disarray around him. And I remembered Grandmother Johnson who had had a stroke and stayed in a wheelchair throughout my childhood, unable even to move her hands or to speak so that she could be understood.

-- Lyndon B. Johnson, The Vantage Point: Perspectives of the Presidency, 1963-1969, 1971.

This quotation from a former President sets forth some of the troubling issues which are common to heart patients from many segments of society. Many are familiar with similar concerns implicit in President Johnson's words: a pressing uncertainty about the future, awareness that the heart attack may happen again, anxiety about the degenerative and disabling process, and possibly feelings of helplessness before the elements of genetic predisposition and of environmental and internal factors beyond one's personal control.

As heart disease is pervasive throughout the world, persons who have experienced heart attacks are legion, particularly in industrialized, western societies.

-295-

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Handbook of Psychology and Health: Cardiovascular Disorders and Behavior - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Handbook of Psychology and Health *
  • 1 - Behavior and Cardiovascular Disease: Issues and Overview 1
  • References 14
  • 2 - Animal Behavior Models of Coronary Heart Disease 19
  • References 50
  • 3 - Perspectives on Coronary-Prone Behavior 57
  • Acknowledgments 77
  • References 77
  • 4 - Attention and Coronary Heart Disease 85
  • Acknowledgments 116
  • References 116
  • 5 - Psychological Factors in Cardiac Arrhythmias and Sudden Death 125
  • Acknowledgments 150
  • References 150
  • 6 - Animal Models of Hypertension 155
  • References 189
  • 7 - Behavioral-Cardiac Interactions in Hypertension 199
  • ACKNOWLDEGMENTS 226
  • References 226
  • 8 - Modification of Coronary-Risk Behavior 231
  • Acknowledgments 270
  • References 270
  • 9 - The Non-Pharmacologic Treatment of Hypertension 277
  • References 291
  • 10 - Recovery and Rehabilitation of Heart Patients: Psychosocial Aspects 295
  • References 328
  • Author Index 335
  • Subject Index 355
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