Horror Films: Current Research on Audience Preferences and Reactions

By James B. Weaver III; Ron Tamborini | Go to book overview

( Lazarus, 1991). Although it may be unlikely that exposure to graphic horror is the cause of most prolonged disturbances, marked disturbances from graphic horror may be problematic in childhood development, and the learning of coping strategies during early exposure to threatening materials can play an important role in adolescent development (cf. Cantor, 1994).

According to the model, all aspects of subsequent experiences feed back to the model's antecedent conditions and influence future interactions of empathy and film content. The harms and benefits associated with these subsequent experiences are the basis for future modifications of empathic processes, stimulus conditioning, and mechanisms for coping with negative relational meanings that result from the interaction of these antecedent conditions. To the extent that this feedback strengthens empathic processes leading to involvement with fictional media, the intensity of response to graphic horror films can be expected to increase. At the same time, in large part, the hedonic quality of these responses will be governed by resulting changes in conditioned stimuli and coping mechanisms.

Issues concerning the extent to which any specific appraisal depends on environmental realities or personality factors remain to be resolved. There are so many realities in film as in life, not just one possible evaluative outcome, that it would restrict our understanding of the emotional processes to think that personality factors associated with imaginative involvement would limit viewers to only one possible experience. Instead, from all experiences made possible in environments created by film, empathic processes can determine which realities are relevant; thus, a shark is a fish, but it can also be your dinner at a restaurant, or you can be its dinner in movies.


REFERENCES

Batson C. D., Duncan B. D., Ackerman P., Buckley T., & Birch K. ( 1981). "Is empathic emotion a source of altruistic motivation?" Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 40, 290-302.

Becker E. ( 1973). The denial of death. New York: The Free Press.

Bell C. ( 1914). Art. London: Chatto & Windus.

Bennett M. J. ( 1979). "Overcoming the golden rule: Sympathy and empathy". In D. Nimmo (Ed.), Communication Yearbook 3(pp. 407-422). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.

Binkley T. ( 1977). "Piece: Contra aesthetics". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 35, 265-277.

Blaney P. ( 1986). "Affect and memory: A review". Psychological Bulletin, 99, 229-246.

Bower G. ( 1992). "How might emotions affect learning?" In S. A. Christianson (Ed.), Handbook of emotion and memory (pp 3-31). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Cantor J. ( 1994). "Fright reactions to mass media". In J. Bryant & D. Zillmann (Eds.), Media effects: Advances in theory and research (pp. 213-246). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Cialdini R. B., Schaller M., Houlihan D., Arps K., Fultz J., & Beaman A. L. ( 1987). "Empathybased helping: is it selflessly or selfishly motivated?" Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 749-758.

Coke J. S., Batson C. D., & McDavis K. ( 1978). "Empathic mediation of helping: A two-stage model". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39, 752-766.

Costa P. T., & McCrae R. R. ( 1980). "Influence of extraversion and neuroticism on subjective well- being: Happy and unhappy people"

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Horror Films: Current Research on Audience Preferences and Reactions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.