Television Critical Viewing Skills Education: Major Media Literacy Projects in the United States and Selected Countries

By James A. Brown | Go to book overview

[I]t would appear that continuity and the accumulation of theoretical and practical experience should be assured. Isolated, short-term projects are of little consequence. Continuity and analysis of results would allow revisions to be made of the nature of instruction in this area. It would thus also be possible to exchange information and experiences between different Latin American projects. (p. 43)

That is precisely the motivation behind this book. So many projects in critical viewing -- especially in the United States -- seem to have arisen, developed for a short while, then faded from sight. Principal persons have moved to other responsibilities; or they have not received adequate institutional support to ensure longevity. And so the wheel turns, with new persons coming on the scene to initiate similar projects; they can benefit from the record of continuity, and from analyzing previous efforts. This analysis seeks to lay out and measure some of the ground trod by others, to assist newcomers to the scene. It is thus not only timely but important to review major patterns of what has been going on in this significant field of sociocultural interaction with the mass medium of television.


NOTES
1.
Among others worldwide, there were Phoenix College and Community Colleges of Glendale, Paradise Valley, and Scottsdale ( Arizona); the University of Windsor ( Ontario, Canada); Skaggs Foundation ( Chicago) and Benton Foundation ( Washington, DC); Media Action Research Center ( New York, Los Angeles) and the Center for Media & Values ( Los Angeles); Strategies for Media Literacy, Inc. ( San Francisco); and Queensland Institute of Technology ( Brisbane, Australia). All explored TV media literacy projects; some published newsletters and journals, conducted surveys of media literacy education, and mounted study projects and conferences 1988- 1990. Other organizations scheduled for mid- 1990 alone four international conferences: in Canada, the Association for Media Literacy and the University of Guelph, Ontario, presented "The New Literacy: Media Education in the 1990s" (May 10-12); in France, the Centre de Liaison de l'Enseignement et des Moyens d'Information joined with the British Film Institute and UNESCO to offer "New Directions in Media Education" (July 2-6); in England, the British Film Institute and University of London's Institute of Education presented IVLA[ International Visual Literacy Association] Symposium 1990 -- "Verbo-Visual Literacy: Mapping the Field" (July 10-13); and in Australia, ATOM Victoria was host to the " 1990ATOM National Media Studies Conference" in Melbourne (September 22-25).
2.
for instance, James Anderson, instrumental in media curricula development by school districts in the Far West and Midwest, was engaged heavily in

-xiv-

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