Television Critical Viewing Skills Education: Major Media Literacy Projects in the United States and Selected Countries

By James A. Brown | Go to book overview

11
Quantitative Profile of CVS Projects

Major projects are inventoried here according to criteria drawn up in Part I, in an attempt to sketch patterns of emphases and strengths in quantitative terms. Of the original 32 projects that provided primary data and also participated in the questionnaire survey ( 1981, 1985), the 23 directly related to CVS are listed in following tables. Another four non-U.S. projects were added (out of 11 described in chapter 10) for which material became available in 1987-1989, despite no previous questionnaire data. Projects were excluded from tabulations when their scope was tangential to critical viewing skills or else representative material was too limited to permit reasonable estimates of how they embodied specific criteria.

The summary of criteria offers guidelines drawn from theorists and experienced practitioners, reflected in the literature (Part I. Although not strictly prescriptive, the list of criteria does suggest ideal characteristics for CVS programs. Not all characteristics would be expected to appear in all programs because of the variety of contexts. Robert White, after previewing the criteria and analyses in Part III, observed that this report properly does not intend "to give the definitive evaluation of these programs. [It does] rate them according to the criteria, but [is] more interested in what we can learn from the experience, [including] the seeming limitations (always seen as limitations in which people tried to do the best under the circumstances or with certain premises)."1 He added that local and national contexts might even

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