Television Critical Viewing Skills Education: Major Media Literacy Projects in the United States and Selected Countries

By James A. Brown | Go to book overview
88.5 Cognition-Developmental (M, N)
126. Cognition-Reasoning Skills (O, P)
100. Pragmatics of Media Education (Q, R, 8, T)
97.7 10 Speciffic Concrete Criteria (a-j)

As noted earlier, projects most consistently manifested characteristics of cognition-reasoning skills (O, P), with a mean of 126 out of possible 135. Clustered somewhat distantly behind were: projects' breadth of sociopolitical context and media aesthetics (A,B), with a mean of 104; pragmatics of media education where the four categories (Q-T) averaged 100; and the 10 specific concrete criteria (a-j) with 97.7. Least intensively present in the 27 projects were: validity and reliability of research bases and accuracy of data and especially testing and evaluating of project materials and results (J-L), averaging 80; and care to address stages of cognitional development in students (M-N), with a mean of 80.5.

It was apparent that most projects incorporated high levels of training in analytical observation and reasoned assessment based on factual data (generally) judged according to meaningful criteria. And they clearly stressed heuristic, inductive exploration over deductive, a priori training based on transmitting principles through lectures and reading texts and published commentaries. Most projects had participants bring their own values (and their families') along with those of their peers, in collaborative discovery, to bear on a synthesis of what they had observed and reflected on in their media experiences.

These raw, quantitative data are fleshed out in the following chapter, which reviews main characteristics of CVS projects in light of the 30 criteria. That summary of their respective emphases, strengths, and highlights as well as shortcomings can help potential users determine which are most appropriate and feasible for them to consider adapting for local use.


NOTES
1.
Robert A. White, executive director, Centre for the Study of Communication and Culture in London, subsequently editor of Sage's Conununication and Human Values series, Rome; in extended critique with personal correspondence to author, November 9, 1988.

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