Television Critical Viewing Skills Education: Major Media Literacy Projects in the United States and Selected Countries

By James A. Brown | Go to book overview

As Scottish expert Eddie Dick ( 1987a) concluded his own world survey of media education:

This, perhaps, should be the place where a sequence of conclusions is offered. However, on the basis of the evidence available, such a closure to this document would verge on the foolish and prove less than useful. Let the descriptions speak for themselves. (p. 69)

Similarly, David Butts ( 1986) concluded his extensive formal research study of Scottish media education by acknowledging that the continually changing status of CVS projects coupled with modifications necessary for his case studies "render it impossible to draw conclusions from empirical work or to make precise recommendations" (p. 159).

A Pragmatic Invitation . Perhaps the most apposite concluding remark is the clichd: Don't re-invent the wheel. Much useful material for fostering critical viewing skills has already been explored and put into organized printed and audiovisual materials, often in full-blown curricular teaching plans. Massive funding accompanied some of that work. The heritage includes widespread experimentation as well as formal research. Classroom teachers, theoretical scholars, as well as pragmatic broadcasters and corporate businessmen have collaborated over time on the many kinds of projects described in this review. Their work should not be overlooked, but rather tapped.

The hope is that this book can help subsequent explorers and practitioners of critical viewing skills review the kinds of results already achieved so they can build on that foundation, even utilizing some of the extensive materials already in the field.


NOTES
1
Cf. Butts ( 1986, p. 7), citing summary by Professor Halloran, director of the Centre for Mass Communications, University of Leicester.

-330-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Television Critical Viewing Skills Education: Major Media Literacy Projects in the United States and Selected Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 371

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.