Stereotype Activation and Inhibition

By Robert S. Wyer Jr. | Go to book overview

suggests that spontaneous suppression was not instigated merely by the knowledge of the target's race. It is likely that the instructions to avoid stereotyping made personal norms against stereotyping the members of that racial group particularly salient. This may have sensitized these participants to avoid using the stereotype in evaluating other members of the group. Thus, when these participants were presented with a second target of the same race, they may have been careful to form an individuated impression of him, thereby obscuring any effects of the previously activated stereotype.

These data suggest two important modifications to Bodenhausen and Macrae's model. First, they show that suppression-induced rebound effects are not inevitable. Rebound effects can be avoided when individuals are motivated (and presumably have the capacity) to engage in controlled processing. Second, they suggest that the rebound effects such as those demonstrated in Macrae et al. ( 1994) might be more accurately considered under the guise of social, rather than personal, control. When individuals are instructed to suppress stereotypes that they do not strongly reject, they may cease engaging in the controlled processing necessary to avoid stereotyping when they no longer believe they must. Rebound effects in this case reflect the weakening of normative demands rather than a failure to maintain personal standards.


CONCLUDING COMMENTS

I hope that these comments reflect my sympathy with the basic model proposed by Bodenhausen and Macrae, and they were offered in the hope that they might help in the continued development of the model. The model's recognition of facilitatory and inhibitory factors in social stereotyping represents a major advancement, and I suspect that the model will be influential in the years ahead. What is yet needed is (a) stronger evidence regarding lateral inhibition in social categorization and (b) greater flexibility in considering how normative and personal factors might influence all stages of the stereotyping process.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

I would like to thank Jeff Sherman for his helpful comments on an earlier draft of this chapter.

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stereotype Activation and Inhibition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 269

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.