Brain Injury and Neuropsychological Rehabilitation: International Perspectives

By Anne-Lise Christensen; Barbara P. Uzzell | Go to book overview

Preface

Most individuals with brain damage experience a curtailment or loss of lifestyle without rehabilitation. Improved methods and appropriately timed medical interventions now make it possible for more individuals to survive brain insults, and to be assisted by rehabilitation neuropsychologists in achieving renewed commitment to life. Damage to the brain, the organ of human emotions and cognition, reduces psychological functioning and realistic adaptation, and the patient and his/her family are often encapsulated in the time prior to injury. To regain part or most of the lifestyle lost, an honest, dedicated, and realistic approach is required.

Neuropsychological rehabilitation can provide tools for this task, provided that the most comprehensive, elaborate, and knowledgebased methods are integrated in the training, and provided that knowledge from many disciplines and from community environments and family is encompassed.

Neuropsychological rehabilitation today has increased throughout the world. In different ways it was initiated in the Soviet Union and in Israel following involvement in wars, and in the United States in the last two decades, due primarily to increasing amount of traumatic motor vehicle accidents. Neuropsychological rehabilitation continues to evolve and undergo change.

Five years ago we recorded in a book a body of knowledge central to neuropsychological rehabilitation from the neurosciences and psychology, which was presented at a conference, "Neuropsychological Reha

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