Total Propaganda: From Mass Culture to Popular Culture

By Alex S. Edelstein | Go to book overview

FOREWORD
Popular Culture and the New Propaganda

Katharine E. Heintz-Knowles University of Washington

One of my favorite advertising campaigns of recent memory is that for Sprite, a soft drink vying for some of the market dominated by Coca-Cola and Pepsi. The radio version of the ad, which I heard on the local "alternative" music station in Seattle, features a young male's voice telling us that he knows that the advertising claims made by other manufacturers are untrue -- drinking a certain beverage will not get him a date or a better grade in school, and he knows that we, the listeners, know that, too. Therefore, he is not going to try to "sell" us anything, but remind us to ignore advertising and "obey our thirst," which, of course, means quenching it with Sprite. This ad attempts to flatter listeners by recognizing that they are media savvy, that they see through advertising and will not believe any contrived claims. The ad is, of course, not above selling us something -- as long as we do not define it as selling.

This particular ad and its related campaign is a perfect exemplar of the new propaganda examined in this book. It targets a younger, more media-savvy (if not necessarily media-literate) generation who are more likely to be participants in the messages than members of any previous generation. It is similar to the Van Halen music video "Right Now," which encourages viewers to turn off the TV and go outside, played on a television channel that requires viewers to be inside the tube to receive ad messages. Or the video game ads that celebrate the active nature of game-playing versus the more reactive activities of nonmediated life.

The students I teach like these types of messages as well. They are tired of hearing about media power and control -- after all, it is they who control the

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Total Propaganda: From Mass Culture to Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 345

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.