Total Propaganda: From Mass Culture to Popular Culture

By Alex S. Edelstein | Go to book overview

10
ROCKPROP Alienation, Fame, and Liberation

On April 8, 1994, famed alternative rock singer and leader of the band Nirvana Kurt Cobain was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in his Seattle home. As a moralist and individualist, he had expressed the complex sources of alienation of all of the generations in songs about life, but he found liberation from fame only in death.

Cobain followed the same path to eternity that was taken by another Seattle rock star, Jimi Hendrix, also a victim of fame, drugs, and alcohol. Hendrix left a legacy of unschooled genius and affability, but Cobain entangled a complex oldprop of anger and exclusion with a troubling newprop of disclosure and intimacy. Long after his death, Hendrix was to be memorialized as a favorite son by Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen with the construction of a museum to harbor his memorabilia. By contrast, Cobain's widow, Courtney Love of Hole, painfully sought a resting place for her more controversial husband.

Cobain no less than Hendrix was a rock leader of enormous stature, and he possessed an unassailable integrity. Right after his death, three Seattle bands performing in New York spoke of him as the leader of their alternative rock culture: The Melvins, who had mentored Cobain in his birthplace of Aberdeen, Washington, the heralded Pearl Jam led by Eddie Vedder, and Mudhoney. Two other limelight Seattle bands, Alice in Chains and Soundgarden, were touring elsewhere but also eulogized Cobain.

Their selections reflected the complex contributions that Cobain and the alternative rock movement had made to a generation. It was not just the musicianship; far more vital was the struggle against cynicism and profit, and the

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Total Propaganda: From Mass Culture to Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 345

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.