Global and Multi-National Advertising

By Basil G. Englis | Go to book overview

3
Implications of Social Values for Consumer Communications: The Case of the European Community

Lynn R. Kahle University of Oregon Sharon Beatty University of Alabama John Mager Eastern Washington University

Culture often manifests itself in political decisions and consumer decisions. These decisions are driven by the individual values that members of the culture hold. Studying political and value structures often provide more efficient and accurate windows to culture than studies of peripheral habits. This chapter examines changing culture by investigating the changing political structure and values in Europe.

Most of the major countries of Western Europe have been moving toward economic cooperation for several decades via what has been known as the Common Market, the European Economic Community, or more recently simply the European Community (EC). The chosen 12 current EC participants are listed in Table 3.1, which in addition provides the population and Gross National Product (GNP) of each listed country. Table 3.1 also shows the relations among the EC, the military North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). Several neutral countries have not participated in the EC, such as Austria and Switzerland, as well as the northern-most countries of Finland, Sweden, Norway, and Iceland. Austria and Turkey would explicitly like to join the EC ( Yemma, 1988), and the EFTA, at worst, has cooperated with the EC. At best, some anticipate unification of the EC and EFTA. Other NATO countries, such as the United States, will most likely not become EC members any time soon, raising questions about the continuing significance of NATO. Some have advocated completely d ECoupling the EC from the United States to form an anti-Stalinist, anti-capitalist type of socialism (e.g., Palmer, 1988).

The EC is gradually moving toward functioning as a super country. The

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