Global and Multi-National Advertising

By Basil G. Englis | Go to book overview

7
National Boundaries in Magazine Advertising: Perspectives on Verbal and Nonverbal Communication

Fairfid M. Caudle. The College of Staten Island, City University of New York

International magazine advertising must overcome many obstacles to convey information across the boundaries posed by diverse languages and social patterns. This chapter explores both the nature of such obstacles as well as some of the strategies that have been devised to overcome them. It presents a qualitative and selective analysis of modes of communication utilized when brands originating in one country or nationality are advertised in publications, of other countries, that are designed for relatively affluent and literate markets. In the discussion that follows, a number of issues will be identified that arise when advertising across national borders. These include issues related to the use of language as well as to several nonverbal, visual modes of communication such as those provided by the depiction of national and cultural symbols and works of art. The goal of this chapter is to highlight aspects of communication that should be beneficial to consider when designing advertisements referring to or crossing national boundaries.


The Globalization Debate

Cultural characteristics and their role in shaping marketing strategy and advertising content have been the subject of considerable debate and research, and the following article citations represent only a small sampling of statements on this issue. One focus of this discussion was stated by Winram ( 1984) who, noting convergences in demography, culture, and media distribution, argued that common needs for products rather than differing national characteristics should carry greater weight. The existence of somewhat similar segments across countries has been proposed in

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