Global and Multi-National Advertising

By Basil G. Englis | Go to book overview

best to present the information serially for greatest discounting of this information.

The paradigm accounts for both the processing of brand information and product category information. The target of most advertising is the brand-name product. However, advertising of category information has become more prevalent. For example, public service announcements concerning nutrition and health (i.e., milk advertisements), information about health risks (i.e., AIDS, drugs), and environmental conservation (i.e., rain forests, redwood trees, etc.) employ category information as the target. Consumers may acquire information about categories in two ways; consumers may be presented information that is general to the category (generic category information), and/or they may learn about product categories by acquiring information about specific subtypes or brands within the category (branded category information). The present paradigm encompasses both methods of processing category information.

Amount of information (26 vs. 13 statements) is useful for investigating the relative impact and survival of strong versus weak brands (categories). Here, a strong brand (category) is defined as one that consumers are most informed about. In addition, processing set may be induced by the kind of information that surrounds or is included in an advertisement. Results of the present experimental research suggest that inducing either type of processing effort leads to more positive evaluations of stronger brands over weaker brands; however, a memory-type processing induction should be avoided when presenting branded category information.

In sum, the present chapter proposes a paradigm for investigating brand processing that has direct applications to marketing and advertising. This paradigm may be employed to determine universal differences in the processing of brand information versus category information for enhanced global advertising strategies.


REFERENCES

Aaker D. A., & Keller K. L. ( 1987). Consumer response to brand extensions. Unpublished manuscript

Chapman L. J., & Chapman J. P. ( 1967). "Genesis of popular but erroneous psychodiagnostic observations". Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 72, 193-204

Cohen J. B., & Chakravarti D. ( 1990). "Consumer psychology". Annual Review of Psychology, 41, 243-288

Greenwald A. G., Pratkanis A. R., Leippe M. R., & Baumgardner M. H. ( 1986). "Under what conditions does theory obstruct research progress?" Psychological Review, 91, 216-229

Hamilton D. L., Dugan P. M., & Trolier T. K. ( 1985). "The formation of stereotypic beliefs: Further evidence for distinctiveness-based illusory correlation". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 48, 5-17.

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