Making and Unmaking the Prospects for Rhetoric: Selected Papers from the 1996 Rhetoric Society of America Conference

By Roxanne Mountford; Carolyn Miller et al. | Go to book overview

STEVEN MAILLOUX University of California, Irvine


Rhetoric 2000: The New Prospects

I want to begin this otherwise theoretical paper with an example, a concrete rhetorical performance to which I can refer. Indeed, most of my paper is simply a gloss on this example:

RHETORICIANS OF THE WORLD UNITE! THE MOMENT OF OUR TRIUMPH IS AT HAND!

This is an example of what the 1971 "Report of the Committee on the Scope of Rhetoric" called "revolutionary rhetoric." The Report had this to say as an engaged description, not a negative evaluation, of such language use: "The rhetoric of revolution is based on an intuition, apprehension, or assumption of a true belief, a cause, a faith. Revolutionary rhetoric is meant to induce religious conversion; its expression may be fanatical -- certainly in many instances, it is frenetic" ( Ehninger210).

I believe that it was not a mistake that The Prospect of Rhetoric, which included this Report, focused so intensely on its contemporary scene of late sixties protest. It was acting responsibly to examine the political effectivity of trope and argument in the establishment- and counterculture of its day. In the words again of the Report: "Rhetorical studies are not in themselves the solution to social, political, or personal problems. They are, however, by their nature and functions relevant to the tasks of social betterment. Rhetorical studies are humanistic studies" ( Ehninger210).

I will return at the end of my paper to the present scene of a larger rhetorical politics extending beyond the academy, but now I want to concentrate on the present disciplinary meaning and possible institutional effects of a call, frenetic or otherwise, that rhetoricians of the world unite. Rhetorical study today offers us a unique opportunity; it has the potential to lead scholars and teachers into a new interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, or even postdisciplinary future. What exactly are these new prospects of rhetoric? I'll begin an answer with some general claims about universities and the role of the humanities.

As producer and conduit of knowledge, the university has often had an ambivalent relationship to the society that supports it. While supplying the basic intellectual tools for carrying out established cultural functions, the university has also been among those institutions providing a space for

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making and Unmaking the Prospects for Rhetoric: Selected Papers from the 1996 Rhetoric Society of America Conference
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.