Coercive Military Strategy

By Stephen J. Cimbala | Go to book overview

Index
Note: Pages with tables are indicated by italics.
ABMs (anti-ballistic missile defenses), 109-10
Abrams, Gen. Creighton, 28
absorption solution to conflict, 117, 119
Acheson, Dean, 193n 6
AirLand Battle concept, 128-29
air power usage: Gulf War of 1991, 81-96, 83, 91-94; success against ground forces, 72; in Vietnam War, 104, 105, 106
Alberts, David S., 130
Allard, Kenneth, 84, 195n 36
alliances. See international coalitions
Allison, Graham T., 44
all-volunteer force, 28, 29
American Revolution as unconventional conflict, 38
annihilation vs. exhaustion strategies, 38-39, 198-99n 28
anti-ballistic missile defenses (ABMs), 109-10
anti-submarine warfare, 108
anti-terrorist raids, U.S. role in, 41
Arab states of the Gulf, 72, 76, 77
a rms race. See military buildup
Army, U.S., 25, 106, 141; 198-99n 28
Art, Robert J., 34, 188n 24
Art of War, The (Sun Tzu), 4-5,168
Aspin, Les, 29
attrition, war of, 84-85, 90, 95, 96. See also exhaustion vs. annihilation strategies
Baker, James, 79
balance of power issues, 39, 63-64, 77, 118. See also strategic nuclear balance of power
Ball, George W., 61
ballistic missile defenses (BMDs), 109-10
bargaining process, 16, 46, 90. See also coercive diplomacy
Bay of Pigs invasion, 52
Bellamy, Chris, 141-42
Blight, James G., 60, 63
BMDs (ballistic missile defenses), 109-10
bombers, strategic, 108
Bosnia crisis/war: and limited war considerations, 146-47; NATO's role in, 140-41, 152; as nonwar action, 126-27; UN vs. NATO in, 125-26, 128, 132
Bottom-Up Review of defense forces, 30-31, 32
Brezhnev, Leonid, 107
Brinton, Crane, 197n 17
Brodie, Bernard, 17
budgetary considerations in use of military forces, 25, 29-31, 30, 32, 41
Bundy, McGeorge, 60, 61-62
Bush, George, 69, 74
Bush administration, 29-30, 194n 27
business vs. military strategy, Vietnam War, 98-102
capitulation solution to conflict, 117, 118, 119
CAPs (Combined Action Platoons), 106
Castro, Fidel, 55-56, 58
casualty issue, 41, 151-52, 152, 153, 196n 55
C3 (command, control and communications), 90, 94
Chaliand, Gerard, 150
Chamberlain, Col. Joshua Lawrence, 7
Chang Yu, 5

-219-

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