Sociology as a Skin Trade: Essays Towards a Reflexive Sociology

By John O'Neill | Go to book overview

11: Embodiment and History in Hegel and Marx

The rediscovery of the concept of alienation by Marxists in search of a framework for the interpretation and critique of socialist reality has been challenged as an attempt to refurbish a speculative Hegelian notion which Marx abandoned for the more precise concept of exploitation. The 'historical Marx', that is to say, Marx of the Communist Manifesto and Capital, whom Marxists themselves have given to history, is now to be forsaken for a history made out of the revolutionary event of Marx's discovery of alienation in the property system and the utopian suggestion that the collectivization of property would end alienation and the prehistory of man.1 These events might be taken to indicate that here at any rate Marx's critique of Hegel appears to have backfired and that Hegel's original concept of alienation as an ontological experience is the more general concept that Marxists now need for the understanding of the unhappy socialist consciousness.

I think it can be argued that what is usually set forth as Marx's redefinition of the Hegelian concept of alienation is nothing else than a progression to be found in the Phenomenology of Mind. If this is indeed so, then the 'existentialist' version of Hegel's concept of alienation is not wholly true to Hegel's account of the relation between the individual and society and cannot be employed to revise Marx. The attempt to correct late Marx with early Marx appears to be a correction in favour of Hegel only if Hegel himself is corrected in terms of a reading of the early phenomenological

____________________
1
J. O'Neill, "Alienation, Class Struggle and Marxian Anti-Politics," Review of Metaphysics, XVII, No. 3, ( March 1964), 462-471.

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sociology as a Skin Trade: Essays Towards a Reflexive Sociology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.