A Guide for the Study of Exceptional Children

By Willard Abraham | Go to book overview

DEDICATION

To children --

who are sure they differ from others; or

who are certain they do not; or

who are in doubt whether they differ; who may be a little wiser or a little less wise, who may see, hear, and say more or less, who may walk more haltingly, but who in their doubtfulness constitute the majority far outnumbering the so-called "normal" and the so-called "average" children.

To teachers and future teachers --

who have heard the phrase "individual differences" and now realize that it is more than a phrase;

who want to help children reach their capacities, as great or as limited as those capacities may be;

who emphasize what children have rather than what they have not, what they can do rather than what they cannot do;

who find daily compensations in working with those who cannot see, those who cannot hear, and those who cannot walk;

who provide these children with the many ways in which they can see, hear, walk, understand, speak, and reason when their ability to do so seems limited or even lacking.

To parents --

Whose faith and hope are constantly challenged but are ever strong.

Whether children are in the range of the so-called "normal" or among those who differ, a teacher's success depends largely on knowing and understanding them, seeing through their eyes, and feeling through their dreams and desires.

In a stage performance well-remembered by many, a lovely lady travelled halfway around the world to sing her thoughts about children to her students:

It's a very ancient saying, Getting to know you --
But a true and honest thought, Putting it my way, but nicely,
That 'if you become a teacher You are precisely
By your pupils you'll be taught.' My cup of tea!
As a teacher I've been learning Getting to know you,
(You'll forgive me if I boast) Getting to feel free and easy;
And I've now become an expert When I am with you,
On the subject I like most: Getting to know what to say --
Haven't you noticed?
Getting to know you . . . Suddenly I'm bright and breezy
Getting to know you, Because of
Getting to know all about you, All the beautiful and new
Getting to like you, things I'm learning about you,
Getting to hope you like me. Day by day."*
Couldn't most of us profit from her bit of philosophy as expressed here?
____________________
*
From The King and I, pp. 39-40. Copyright 1951 by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein 2nd; Williamson Music, Inc., owner of publication and allied rights. Used with permission.

-v-

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A Guide for the Study of Exceptional Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Dedication v
  • Table of Contents vi
  • Introduction ix
  • THE IMPORTANCE OF THE PROBLEM OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN x
  • FORMAT OF THE GUIDE xii
  • Procedures 1
  • Personal Information 27
  • Bi-Lingual Children 33
  • Children with Emotional or Social Maladjustments 53
  • Gifted Children 75
  • Bibliography on Gifted Children 105
  • Children with Hearing Problems 113
  • Mentally Retarded Children 131
  • Orthopedic and Other Handicaps 155
  • Children with Speech Problems 181
  • Children with Visual Problems 203
  • Resources and Aids 223
  • General Bibliography 225
  • Postscripts and a Final Note 265
  • I Taught Them All 266
  • The Poor Scholar's Soliloquy 267
  • The Animal School 269
  • Greeting His Pupils 270
  • The Child Who is Different 271
  • A Final Note to the User of This Guide 276
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