A Guide for the Study of Exceptional Children

By Willard Abraham | Go to book overview

On the importance of considering the individual child . . .


I TAUGHT THEM ALL*

by N. J. W.

I have taught in high school for ten years. During that time I have given assignments, among others, to a murderer, an evangelist, a pugilist, a thief, and an imbecile.

The murderer was a quiet little boy who sat on the front seat and regarded me with pale blue eyes; the evangelist, easily the most popular boy in the school, had the lead in the junior play; the pugilist lounged by the window and let loose at intervals a raucous laugh that startled even the geraniums; the thief was a gay-hearted Lothario with a song on his lips; and the imbecile, a soft-eyed little animal seeking the shadows.

The murderer awaits death in the state penitentiary; the evangelist has lain a year now in the village churchyard; the pugilist lost an eye in a brawl in Hong Kong; the thief, by standing on tiptoe, can see the windows of my room from the county jail; and the once gentle-eyed little moron beats his head against a padded wall in the state asylum.

All of these pupils once sat in my room, sat and looked at me gravely across worn brown desks. I must have been a great help to those pupils --I taught them the rhyming scheme of the Elizabethan sonnet and how to diagram a complex sentence.

____________________
*
This statement signed N. J. W. appeared in The Clearing House, November, 1937. (reprinted in Schorling R., Student Teaching, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1949, p. 29.)

-266-

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A Guide for the Study of Exceptional Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Dedication v
  • Table of Contents vi
  • Introduction ix
  • THE IMPORTANCE OF THE PROBLEM OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN x
  • FORMAT OF THE GUIDE xii
  • Procedures 1
  • Personal Information 27
  • Bi-Lingual Children 33
  • Children with Emotional or Social Maladjustments 53
  • Gifted Children 75
  • Bibliography on Gifted Children 105
  • Children with Hearing Problems 113
  • Mentally Retarded Children 131
  • Orthopedic and Other Handicaps 155
  • Children with Speech Problems 181
  • Children with Visual Problems 203
  • Resources and Aids 223
  • General Bibliography 225
  • Postscripts and a Final Note 265
  • I Taught Them All 266
  • The Poor Scholar's Soliloquy 267
  • The Animal School 269
  • Greeting His Pupils 270
  • The Child Who is Different 271
  • A Final Note to the User of This Guide 276
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