The Administration of the American Revolutionary Army

By Louis Clinton Hatch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII.
NEWBURG ADDRESSES.

WHEN the patience of the soldiers was exhausted, they mutinied; when the officers could no longer restrain themselves, they presented a memorial or threatened to resign. In the last year of the war the army was perhaps more comfortable than at any previous time, but the officers were discontented and irritable. Their condition was like that of a man who, exhausted with carrying a heavy load, has at last been relieved of a part of it : the help comes too late; he still staggers, and the slightest increase in his burden may cause a complete collapse. The long war and the intercourse with the French army had produced their natural results : there was less pride in Spartan simplicity, more sensitiveness at being compelled to live in a manner unbecoming "an officer and a gentleman."

In justice to the American officers it must be admitted that the position in which they were placed was a trying one. The government was in desperate straits for money, and Quartermaster Pickering pinched and pared at every opportunity. Major Shaw wrote that he hoped Pickering would be removed, for the baleful effects of his economy were felt all over the continent.1 At the same time Sands was refusing the officers the privilege of drawing their extra rations at their own convenience. Washington wrote to the Secretary at War that he was "exceedingly impressed with the necessity of economizing the public monies"; but warned him that "we

____________________
1
Shaw to Knox, December 27, 1781, Knox MSS. viii. 24.

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Administration of the American Revolutionary Army
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES i
  • Title Page iii
  • PREFACE. v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter 1 - FORMATION OF THE ARMY. 1
  • Chapter II - CONGRESS AND THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. 18
  • Chapter III - APPOINTMENT AND PROMOTION. 35
  • Chapter IV - FOREIGN OFFICERS. 47
  • Chapter V - PAY AND HALF-PAY. 71
  • Chapter VI - SUPPLYING THE ARMY. 86
  • Chapter VII - MUTINIES OF 1781. 124
  • Chapter VIII - NEWBURG ADDRESSES. 142
  • Chapter IX - MUTINY OF 1783 AND DISBANDMENT OF THE ARMY. 179
  • APPENDICES. 197
  • INDEX. 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.