Death in the Forest: The Story of the Katyn Forest Massacre

By J. K. Zawodny | Go to book overview

Introduction

MORE THAN 15,000 Polish soldiers, among them 800 Doctors of Medicine, were murdered in one operation. Originally they had been taken into captivity by the Soviet Army in 1939. There was a possibility, however, that the prisoners, while still alive, had been taken from Soviet custody by German forces in 1941.

Some of the bodies were found in German-held territory. The ropes with which their hands were tied were Sovietmade, but the bullets with which the men were killed were of German origin.

The Soviet and German governments accused each other of the massacre. To obtain or remove the evidence, the intelligence services of several nations carried on a merciless secret contest in the Katyn Forest, Poland, Germany, Italy, England, and the United States. Men disappeared; so did files, including one from the United States Military Intelligence Office. In the process a key witness was found hanged, diplomatic and military careers were destroyed in the United States, personnel of the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg lied by omission, and so did some of the greatest Allied leaders of the Second World War.

-ix-

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Death in the Forest: The Story of the Katyn Forest Massacre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • DEATH ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • I- The Prisoners Who Vanished 3
  • II- The Graves in the Forest 15
  • III- The Inconvenient Allies-- Alive and Dead 29
  • IV- The Soviet Commission Investigation 49
  • V- Nuremberg- Crime and Punishment in International Politics 59
  • VI- Analysis of the Evidence 77
  • VII- Reconstruction- To the Edge of the Graves 101
  • Vlll Reconstruction- Marked to Live and Marked to Die 127
  • IX- Problems Caused by Katyn after the War 169
  • Appendix 199
  • Index 219
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