Death in the Forest: The Story of the Katyn Forest Massacre

By J. K. Zawodny | Go to book overview

I
The Prisoners Who Vanished

THE GERMAN PUBLIC believed that the Second World War began with a number of Polish attacks on the German frontier. A typical episode was the attack on a radio station deep in German territory on August 31, 1939. "Poles" had commenced military activity by shooting their way in and out of a radio station, and, having seized it, broadcast an abusive speech in Polish and German. One dead Pole was found at the door of the station; his glassy eyes, blood-smeared face and the wreckage of the station were mute testimony to the raiding action which lasted three or four minutes. The German press marvelled at the remarkable knowledge of the terrain and of the building displayed by the "Poles" and announced that after a furious gun battle with the police, one of the raiders was killed and all others arrested.

Details of the raid on the German station became known after the war. The leader of the raiding party testified to the actual circumstances at the Nuremberg trial of war criminals. His name was A. H. Naujock. He was not a Pole, but a German, a long-standing member of the SS.

In the late summer of 1939 A. H. Naujock had been ordered personally by Heydrich, Chief of Sipo and S. D. (organs of the German security system), to attack the radio station at Gleiwitz and to allow a Polish-speaking German to make an inflammatory speech in Polish and German. Naujock and his

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Death in the Forest: The Story of the Katyn Forest Massacre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • DEATH ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • I- The Prisoners Who Vanished 3
  • II- The Graves in the Forest 15
  • III- The Inconvenient Allies-- Alive and Dead 29
  • IV- The Soviet Commission Investigation 49
  • V- Nuremberg- Crime and Punishment in International Politics 59
  • VI- Analysis of the Evidence 77
  • VII- Reconstruction- To the Edge of the Graves 101
  • Vlll Reconstruction- Marked to Live and Marked to Die 127
  • IX- Problems Caused by Katyn after the War 169
  • Appendix 199
  • Index 219
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