America and the Atlantic Community: Anglo-American Aspects, 1790-1850

By Frank Thistlethwaite | Go to book overview

Preface

THE occasion of this book was a course of public lectures given in the Fall Term of 1956 at the University of Pennsylvania as Visiting Professor of American Civilization. This Professorship, of which I had the honor to be the first holder, serves the imaginative purpose of bringing to the Graduate Department of American Civilization a European scholar in the hope that he may illuminate the cultural connections between the United States and Europe. I should like to record my admiration for the intellectual generosity which prompted the scheme and characterizes the interdisciplinary work of the Department, and to thank the University of Pennsylvania and especially its Vice-Provost, Professor Roy F. Nichols, the Chairman of the Department, Professor Robert E. Spiller, and Professor Thomas C. Cochran for what was to me a most rewarding appointment.

Because of its occasion the book was cast in lecture form and the text remains as it was delivered except for minor elaborations and the expansion into separate chapters of two sections which were unduly compressed owing to limited lecture time.

It owes something to conversations with many scholars on both sides of the Atlantic. It was especially fostered by the late John Bartlet Brebner whose work helped to focus historically ideas which grew out of wartime pre-occupations with Anglo-American relations, and whose friendship and masterly guidance were a stimulous over the years down to the last months of his life when, though ill, he gave such patient

-v-

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America and the Atlantic Community: Anglo-American Aspects, 1790-1850
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1. the Economic Relation 3
  • 2. British Political Radicals and the United States 39
  • 3. the Anglo-American World of Humanitarian Endeavor 76
  • 4. Freedom for Slaves and Women 103
  • 5. Cross-Currents in Educational Reform 134
  • 6. the Nature and Limits of the Atlantic Connection 151
  • Index 207
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