America and the Atlantic Community: Anglo-American Aspects, 1790-1850

By Frank Thistlethwaite | Go to book overview

4. Freedom for Slaves and Women

W HEN Joseph Sturge visited the United States in 1841 in the cause of international peace, he also had a second Quakerly concern which he considered equally important: the abolition of American slavery.1

Slavery had always been the outstanding issue of conscience for evangelicals. John Newton, the evangelical preacher who gave spiritual guidance to the Clapham sect, had seen the light as a slave-trader on the Middle Passage and had directed Wilberforce and the others towards their campaign against the trade. The abolition of the slave trade in the British Empire in 1807 was the high achievement of the evangelicals. The successful campaign with its novel methods for swaying public opinion brought evangelicals into the limelight, and, more than any other missionary work, set the pattern for philanthropic radicalism. As has been seen, the techniques employed before 1807, were the model, not only for the subsequent campaign against slavery itself, but for a whole congeries of revivalistic campaigns in Britain and America.

Slavery was also peculiarly relevant to the Atlantic connection. It was a prime economic factor in the Atlantic, and both West Indian islands and Southern mainland shared its effects. Consciences were stirred against the institution at about the same time in England and America. In the last quarter of the eighteenth century the Society of Friends, outside the American South, set its face against slaveholding. Even before the American Revolution, a Philadelphia

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America and the Atlantic Community: Anglo-American Aspects, 1790-1850
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1. the Economic Relation 3
  • 2. British Political Radicals and the United States 39
  • 3. the Anglo-American World of Humanitarian Endeavor 76
  • 4. Freedom for Slaves and Women 103
  • 5. Cross-Currents in Educational Reform 134
  • 6. the Nature and Limits of the Atlantic Connection 151
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.