Indians of the High Plains: From the Prehistoric Period to the Coming of Europeans

By George E. Hyde | Go to book overview

9. Padoucas, Comanches, and Ietans

WHEN THE UNITED STATES took over the Louisiana Territory the Comanches were almost unknown, and American explorers and traders mentioned the tribe under several names, most often terming these Indians Ietans, at times confusing them with the southern Pawnees of Red River. They were on rare occasions termed Padoucas; but in 1846 the treaty commissioners, P. M. Butler and M. G. Lewis, who were in camp with the Comanches, holding councils with the chiefs, made the bald statement that on the prairies the Comanches were generally known as Padoucas. Indian Agent Neighbors soon after this date repeated the assertion that the Comanches were called Padoucas, adding that the Caddo name for the Comanches was Sowato, a slight error, as Sowato happened to be the Caddo name for the Lipan Apaches, who were really Padoucas. These American officials of 1845-50 seem to have been pretty badly mixed up about who the Padoucas were; but their statements were printed in Schoolcraft's volumes, and for a century later most authors who dealt with Indian matters accepted blindly the assertion that the Padoucas were Comanches. Even today there seems to be no end to this confusion. Frank Secoy made a study of the Padoucas and came to the firm conclusion that they were Apaches; but he added to this that about the date 1750 the French of Louisiana shifted the name Padouca to the Comanches, who now occupied the old Padouca lands in the plains. Mr. Secoy did a fine piece of work on the

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Indians of the High Plains: From the Prehistoric Period to the Coming of Europeans
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOG CARD NUMBER: vi
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • I. the Early Apaches 3
  • 2. the Padouca Nation 28
  • 3. the Coming of the Utes and Comanches 52
  • 4. the Apache Debacle 63
  • 5. the Comanche Advance 93
  • 6. Rise of the Gens Du Serpent 117
  • 7. Saskatchewan to Río Grande 146
  • 8. the End of Old Times 171
  • 9. Padoucas, Comanches, and Ietans 199
  • Index 221
  • THE CIVILIZATION OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN SERIES 229
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