Sterling-Dollar Diplomacy: Anglo-American Collaboration in the Reconstruction of Multilateral Trade

By Richard N. Gardner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
PLANNING FOR COMMERCIAL COLLABORATION

THE publication of the White and Keynes plans in the spring of 1943 indicated that planning for post-war financial collaboration was far advanced. But an effective multilateral régime could not be created by planning on the financial side alone; it would have to be based on equivalent measures in the field of commercial policy. As we have seen, an adequate mechanism of adjustment--either by internal correctives or exchange fluctuations--was an essential element in a monetary plan designed to facilitate multilateral payments. Neither of these devices could have its intended effect on a country's balance of payments unless other countries were restrained in their use of commercial restrictions. Thus collaboration in the control of trade barriers was obviously a necessary supplement to collaboration in the financial field.


THE CONCEPTION OF I.T.O.

Although the fact was not widely publicized at the time, both the White and Keynes plans had early counterparts in the field of commercial policy. In the United States, as might be expected, the subject received particularly intensive consideration. For nearly three decades Cordell Hull had dreamt of drafting a comprehensive code to govern the conduct of world trade. At last this dream was becoming a reality. The main responsibility for bringing it to life now devolved upon the State Department's Division of Commercial Policy under Harry Hawkins and the inter-departmental committees set up to co-ordinate the post-war planning of the various branches of the Administration.1

The main assumptions behind this activity were summed up in a memorandum prepared by one of the inter-departmental committees:

A great expansion in the volume of international trade after the war will be essential to the attainment of full and effective employment in the United States and elsewhere, to the preservation of private enterprise, and to the success of an international security system to prevent future wars.

____________________
1
For details on the organization of post-war commercial policy planning in the United States see Notter, op. cit.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sterling-Dollar Diplomacy: Anglo-American Collaboration in the Reconstruction of Multilateral Trade
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.