Southern Slavery and the Law, 1619-1860

By Thomas D. Morris | Go to book overview

Bibliography
This bibliography is organized as follows:Unpublished primary material: county records, manuscriptsPublished primary material: newspapers and periodicals, legal treatises, statutes, appellate casesOther published primary materialSecondary works: books, articles, dissertations
UNPUBLISHED PRIMARY MATERIAL

County Records
The records from the Southern counties vary in quality and accessibility. Some--either the originals or on microfilm--are available in the state archives. Those for Louisiana (except for some material transferred to the state archives from St. Landry Parish), Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida are presently in the county courthouses. In either case many county records have not survived. Some were not kept, and some were lost in ordinary courthouse fires. I have tried to assemble a representative sample from throughout the South. The sole exception is Delaware. For that state, with the smallest number of slaves anywhere in the South, I relied on published records and secondary studies. For the remainder of the region I used records from urban and rural counties scattered over time. In some cases the records used cover over half a century. In others it might be chunks of ten or more years. The minimum number of counties whose records were used for any state was two. This was dictated by accessibility and the limits of any one person's ability to examine these records.The files include probate records, order books, minute books, criminal dockets, and trial papers. Because the nature of the property involved in most civil actions was rarely recorded, the county records are more valuable for insights into the criminal justice system, but some cases on the civil side are helpful as well. The material was rounded out for some counties with information in the manuscript census microfilms available from the National Archives. The county records used in this study come from the following counties:
Alabama: Chambers and Lowndes.
Arkansas: Arkansas, Crittenden, Jefferson, Pulaski, and Union.
Florida: Leon and Madison.
Georgia: Baldwin, Chatham, Elbert, Hancock, Jackson, Liberty, Lincoln, Putnam, and Screven.
Kentucky: Boyle, Jessamine, Mercer, Scott, and Warren.
Louisiana: Natchitoches, St. Landry, and West Feliciana.
Maryland: Anne Arundel, Frederick, Prince Georges, Queen Anne, Somerset, and Talbot.
Mississippi: Adams, Lowndes, and Wilkinson.
Missouri: Boone and Saline.
North Carolina: Edgecombe, Granville, New Hanover, and Northampton.
South Carolina: Fairfield, Greenville, Laurens, Marlborough, Spartanburg, and York.
Tennessee: Davidson and Maury.

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