The Abolition of Feudalism: Peasants, Lords, and Legislators in the French Revolution

By John Markoff | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

On the cover a solitary name stakes a claim that this book has a single author; but the references at the bottoms of the pages within show something of the community without which this book couldn't exist. The footnotes indicate only some of what is owed to others. Gilbert Shapiro thought up the systematic study of the cahiers de doléances and, together with Sasha Weitman, had carried out much preliminary work toward the coding of these documents when I joined them. It's easy enough to thank them for the creation of an essential data set; I cannot begin, however, to thank them for all I've learned from them. It's been a long time since I attended Robert Forster's graduate seminar on the French Revolution, the first course in history in which I'd ever formally enrolled, but it remains with me as a model of how to work with students. Like others who were graduate students in the same time and place, I found the sociology department created by James Coleman and Arthur Stinchcombe a garden that in exile, I'd hope to re-create.

Some of the analyses and arguments in this book and some of its words had earlier versions as articles or talks and I found many people willing to read these early drafts of chapters. I'm grateful to all those who generously gave me comments on these versions: Silvio Baretta, Seymour Drescher, Jack Goldstone, Peter Jones, D. Carroll Joynes, John Marx, Peter McPhee, James Riley, Eugen Weber, Arthur Stinchcombe, Rainer Baum, William Brustein, Lynn Hunt, Daniel Regan, Charles Tilly, Donald Sutherland, Jeremy Popkin, Isser Woloch, Colin Lucas, Lloyd Moote, Sidney Tarrow, George Taylor, Sasha Weitman, Susan Olzak, Gilbert Shapiro, Norman Ravitch, François Furet, and Harvey Graff. Later, others commented, sometimes in extraordinarily generous detail, on complete or nearly complete drafts of the book: Arthur Stinchcombe, Peter Jones, Cynthia Bouton, Carmenza Gallo, John Marx, Timothy Tackett, Peter McPhee, Anatoly Ado, Ludmila Pimenova, Robert Forster, William Doyle, and Mounira Charrad. Other scholars managed to find the time to answer queries about their own work or let me make use of their unpublished or even unfinished research. For these and other sorts of help I thank Timothy Tackett, Melvin Edelstein, Anthony Crubaugh, Nancy Fitch, Cynthia Bouton, Jean Nicolas,

-xvii-

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