The Abolition of Feudalism: Peasants, Lords, and Legislators in the French Revolution

By John Markoff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
4

ON THE IDEOLOGICAL CONSTRUCTION OF THE SEIGNEURIAL REGIME BY THE THIRD ESTATE (AND OF TWO SEIGNEURIAL REGIMES BY THE NOBILITY)

The meaning of any social institution to those who support it or oppose it must he in part in its transactions with other institutions. The seigneurial rights in particular have, from the eighteenth century to the present, been discussed in conjunction with "feudalism." Yet there are few terms on which scholars so intensely insist on the necessity of proper usage and on which there is so little actual consensus as to what that proper usage might be.1

For those who were to sit in the Revolution's legislatures, this and related terms were part of their everyday vocabulary and, as such, constituted important elements of their tools for understanding the waves of rural insurrection as well as the terms in which their actions to regenerate France

____________________
1
When the papers of the important 1968 Toulouse colloquium on "the abolition of feudalism in the Western world" were published, this discomfort was betrayed in a cover format that featured "féodalité " within quotation marks that don't appear on the title page. See L'Abolition de la féodalité dans le monde occidental ( Paris: Editions du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1971). I have tried to explore why this term has so successfully resisted consensual definition in JohnMarkoff

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Abolition of Feudalism: Peasants, Lords, and Legislators in the French Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 689

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.