Sterling-Dollar Diplomacy: Anglo-American Collaboration in the Reconstruction of Multilateral Trade

By Richard N. Gardner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVII
THE END OF THE I.T.O.

WE have observed the decline of two of the main instruments for the achievement of multilateral trade. It remains now to describe the fate of the third--the still uncompleted project for commercial collaboration aimed, among other things, at 'the reduction of tariffs and other trade barriers' and at 'the elimination of all forms of discriminatory treatment in international commerce'.1 The extent of Anglo-American agreement on these objectives would be tested in three specific ways. First, there would be the round of tariff and preference bargaining whose results would be embodied in a General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. Second, there would be the negotiations to complete the drafting of the Charter of the International Trade Organization. Third, there would be the campaign to win approval for the I.T.O. in Britain and the United States. These crucial tests of Anglo-American economic collaboration will form our next and final subject of concern.


TARIFFS AND PREFERENCES: THE DAY OF RECKONING

The terms of the tariff-preference settlement remained one of the great unresolved Anglo-American issues. On the level of general principle, agreement had already been achieved. The London Draft of the I.T.O. Charter had incorporated the basic provisions of the 'Proposals': no new preferences would be created nor existing preferences increased; reductions in the most-favoured-nation rate would automatically reduce the margins of preference; existing international commitments would not stand in the way of agreed reductions in preference. There was also agreement on the oldest and most basic commitment of all--the obligation (as it was now stated) to enter upon request into 'reciprocal and mutually advantageous negotiations . . . directed to the substantial reduction of tariffs . . . and to the elimination of import tariff preferences'.2 But what would happen when the time came to implement this

____________________
1
Article Seven of the Mutual Aid Agreement.
2
London Draft, Article 24 (1). The same commitment was embodied in the final version of the I.T.O. Charter adopted at Havana, Article 17. Havana Charter for an International Trade Organization, Dept. of State Publ. 3206 ( Washington, 1948).

-348-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sterling-Dollar Diplomacy: Anglo-American Collaboration in the Reconstruction of Multilateral Trade
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.