Free Expression in the Age of the Internet: Social and Legal Boundaries

By Jeremy Harris Lipschultz | Go to book overview

11
Comparative International Issues

"The first-tier global media giants are using all of these methods to see themselves among those privileged Internet content providers who are being 'pushed' into people's attention and not getting left in obscurity."

-- Edward Herman and Robert McChesne, media scholars ( 1997)

"There is a significant cultural component to all technological issues, particularly the component of 'self-colonization' or the acceptance of the superiority of Western values and practices."

-- Annabelle Sreberny-Mohammadi, mass media scholar ( 1997)

The latest settlers have little interest in the cyberstate of nature or the utopian manifestoes of pioneers, like John Perry Barlow's oft-cited "A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace," which defied any state's assertion of control over the Internet.

-- New York Times opinion ( 1998)

"It's like when you start a colony. . . . The first thing you do is you find out where the water is. The next thing you do is form couples, start families. The notion of having law, which is a way to order social interactions, only happens after you have a lot of social interactions such that they become problematic."

-- Mike Godwin, legal thinker ( 1998)

"It's a chance to think about first-level questions. . . . With ninetenths of my other cases, the same issue has already been decided. With this, you can say maybe you need to think in a new way about it."

-- Cindy Cohn, lawyer ( 1998)

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