Expressive Processes in Group Counseling: Theory and Practice

By Nina W. Brown | Go to book overview

4
THEORIES

RATIONALE FOR WORKING WITH EXPRESSIVE PROCESSES

Framework

Theories provide frameworks for understanding expressive processes: that is, creating, analyzing, and interpreting the material that emerges. It is assumed that the counselor will be knowledgeable about major counseling theories, and have in-depth knowledge of object relations, gestalt, existential, Jungian, and person- centered theories.

Why these theories and not some others? Almost any major counseling theory can incorporate use of expressive processes. These particular theories were selected because these are the ones that contributed most to my knowledge and development as a counselor educator. My students have responded favorably to these and have expressed an understanding of their usefulness. My recommendation is that the reader not feel bound to these theories, but use them as a starting point to understand how expressive processes can facilitate therapy.


Object Relations Theories

Object Relations theories describe how individuals came to be as they are, the quality of their relationships with others, and focus on the psychological development of the individual from birth. Concepts incorporated by several object relations theorists explain what healthy development is and suggest ages at which stages as phases most likely occur, as well as variables that impact development. Many delays, interruptions, traumas, deficits, and other factors in development appear in symbolic form in products of expressive processes. The group leader is not expected to analyze or interpret the product; however, when group members explain their products, early developmental issues, particularly unresolved ones, are very likely to be present. The group leader will miss much valuable material if he/she is not familiar with psychological growth and

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Expressive Processes in Group Counseling: Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - Foundations 1
  • 2 - Maximizing Outcomes 19
  • 3 - Nonverbal Communication 29
  • 4 - Theories 39
  • 5 - Guidelines 55
  • 6 - Applications 67
  • 7 - Art 81
  • 8 - Imagery 95
  • 9 - Dreams 107
  • 10 - Writing 119
  • 11 - Fairy Tales 129
  • 12 - Movement 145
  • References 153
  • Index 157
  • About the Author 161
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