Expressive Processes in Group Counseling: Theory and Practice

By Nina W. Brown | Go to book overview

7
ART

APPLICATIONS AND PROCESS FOR ART ACTIVITIES

Rationale

Art activities can be very useful in group counseling, primarily because they do not rely on words to express feelings and emotions, or ambiguous or vague concepts when communicating with others. There are times when words are inadequate, unavailable, or used to conceal, and art activities provide additional means for expression. There are also individuals with low verbal skills who must struggle to express their thoughts, feelings and emotions, attitudes, opinions, and so forth. It's not that they do not want to--they just don't have adequate vocabularies or skills. Art activities allow for a different mode for expression of feelings for these individuals. Art can also serve as a mode of response when using other expressive processes such as imagery and fairy tales.

There are numerous varieties of art activities, each with its own unique advantages; however, this discussion will focus on only a few. These were selected because they can be described easily, can be completed by almost anyone, are not overly time consuming, and have been shown to be useful in therapy. There are other art activities that also meet these criteria and the reader is encouraged to seek them out. A distinct advantage for the presented art activities is the usability in group counseling. Each has been used and found to facilitate group progress. The selected art activities also have the advantage of being simple to execute by the leader and require no artistic ability or training as an art therapist. It is helpful if the leader has had experience and/or training, but an interest in these kinds of activities and an understanding of how they facilitate group and members progress are sufficient.

Art therapists, on the other hand, do have to have extensive formal training. These are professionals who can interpret art products. Their use of art activities is very different from that described in this book. They are trained professionals who can make in-depth analyses, which are far beyond that which is proposed

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Expressive Processes in Group Counseling: Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - Foundations 1
  • 2 - Maximizing Outcomes 19
  • 3 - Nonverbal Communication 29
  • 4 - Theories 39
  • 5 - Guidelines 55
  • 6 - Applications 67
  • 7 - Art 81
  • 8 - Imagery 95
  • 9 - Dreams 107
  • 10 - Writing 119
  • 11 - Fairy Tales 129
  • 12 - Movement 145
  • References 153
  • Index 157
  • About the Author 161
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