To Promote, Defend, and Redeem: The Catholic Literary Revival and the Cultural Transformation of American Catholicism, 1920-1960

By Arnold Sparr ; Henry Warner Bowden | Go to book overview

7
The Transformation of the Catholic Literary Revival in the American Catholic College During the 1930s and 1940s

The mid-- 1930s represented a transition period in the Catholic literary revival and n the development of American Catholic religious thought. As in all transition periods, a number of contradictory emphases stood side-by-side. The promotional-apologetic theme in the Catholic literary revival remained a strong and constant factor. Lucille Papin Borden persisted in writing Catholic novels upholding Catholic moral and philosophical positions well into the 1940s, and indiscriminating Catholic critics like Francis X. Talbot continued to review them with predictable acclaim. Neo-scholastic philosophy still held the status of ideology in most American Catholic intellectual circles. 1 And there were still mid-- 1930s summonses by Daniel A. Lord and others for American Chestertons.

The history of American Catholicism in the 1930s, however, will be remembered not for how much it resembled the 1920s, but for how much it represented reversals in the mentality of the previous decade. The events of the 1930s had much to do with these changes. The Depression called forth new developments in Catholic social thought and, more than any other twentieth century event, forced Catholic Americans out of the parochial group-interest mentality that marked the 1920s Church.

New theological emphases--the Incarnation, the liturgy, and developments in Christology and the theology of the Mystical Body--also reshaped the intellectual outlook of many Catholic Americans. These theological breakthroughs were also linked to 1930s events as the challenge of Protestant neo-orthodoxy, the spiritual crisis between the wars, the rise of dehumanizing totalitarian ideologies, and finally war itself, forced Catholic thinkers, first in Europe and then America, to give

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
To Promote, Defend, and Redeem: The Catholic Literary Revival and the Cultural Transformation of American Catholicism, 1920-1960
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.