Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy

By Paul R. Paradise | Go to book overview

6
Pursuing the Counterfeiters

David Woods has just finished testifying for the plaintiff about how he scammed the defendant by successfully convincing the alleged trademark counterfeiter to sell to him by posing as a legitimate buyer, thus furnishing the evidence needed. Now, it is the defendant's turn to question Woods. The defendant's attorney would love to rip Wood's testimony apart and so pounces on the only opening he sees available: Woods posed as a buyer and he lied to his client.

Although his client has not been charged with criminal conduct and hence there is no issue of entrapment, the defendant's lawyer will nonetheless try to make an issue of entrapment. If nothing else, he will try to convey to the jury that this private investigator, David Woods, is not a fellow to be trusted. This is a frequently used trial tactic, termed character assassination.

The defense attorney goes over the facts very carefully. He wants the jury to understand that Woods lied to his client and comes right out with it. "You lied to my client, didn't you?"

"Yes, I did," Woods replies.

"Are you in the habit of lying to people?" the attorney asks.

Before Woods can answer, the plaintiff's attorney objects to the line of questioning. The judge nods his head and sustains the objection. The defense counsel becomes livid, since he has been shot down before he has even begun his main line of questioning. Obviously, the judge doesn't see the relevancy, the defense counsel thinks to himself; he asks for permission to approach the bench.

"Your honor, I'm trying to establish that the witness tricked my client--that Woods lied to him."

-111-

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Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Trademark Counterfeiting 1
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - The Worldwide Threat 21
  • Notes 40
  • 3 - The Trade Dispute with the People's Republic of China 41
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - The Knockoff 73
  • Notes 93
  • 5 - Street Peddlers and Flea Markets 95
  • Notes 110
  • 6 - Pursuing the Counterfeiters 111
  • 7 - The Entertainment Industries 127
  • Notes 173
  • 8 - The Pill Pirates 175
  • Notes 202
  • 9 - Nuts and Bolts 205
  • Notes 229
  • 10 - Piracy in Cyberspace 231
  • Notes 246
  • 11 - Public Education 247
  • Notes 257
  • Selected Readings 259
  • Index 261
  • About the Author 270
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