Langston Hughes: Folk Dramatist in the Protest Tradition, 1921-1943

By Joseph McLaren | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I wish to thank the following individuals who, in various capacities, assisted me in the completion of this project. Professors Rhett Jones, Charles Nichols, and the late George Bass, my graduate advisers at Brown University; my former colleagues at Mercy College, where I received Faculty Research Grants in the late 1980s; Hofstra University, which has supported this endeavor through a series of Faculty Development Grants.

Others have been helpful in giving advice, encouragement, information, or materials: Sam Black, Margaret Goss Burroughs, Alice Childress, John Henrik Clarke, John Deas, Charles Dryden, Michael Flug, Roger Gocking, Jerome Harris, Sharon Howard, Richard Hudson, Theodore Hudson, Clarence Irving, Caroline Jackson-Smith, Ronald and Karen Johnson, Kevin LaGrandeur, Rosetta LeNoire, W. Thomas MacCary, Alexandar Mihailovic, Donald Morales, Hope Nisly, Kathy Perkins, Arnold Rampersad, Carol W. Robinson, Randy Weston, Deborah Willis, and Cynthia Wynn.

Members of the Karamu House staff were extremely helpful: Emily Laster, Shraine Newman, and James Nicholson. Former Gilpin Players Calvin Thomas and, especially, Festus R. Fitzhugh, an original Gilpin Player, graciously shared their knowledge, as did Reuben Silver and early members of the dance group, Roger Mae Johnson, George Livingston, Lottie Calloway Reed, and Ora Leak Woolley. Helpful as well were former members of the Skyloft Players, Brunetta Bernstein, Rosalie Dorsey Davis, and Irma Cayton Wertz, along with their associates,

-xv-

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Langston Hughes: Folk Dramatist in the Protest Tradition, 1921-1943
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Dedication Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Note xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • Endnotes 12
  • Chapter 1 - Folk Comedy in Collaboration: The Mule Bone Affair 17
  • Endnotes 29
  • Chapter 2 - Radical Drama and the Black Community 33
  • Endnotes 54
  • Chapter 3 - The Tragic Mode: Mulatto 59
  • Endnotes 74
  • Chapter 4 - The Gilpin Players and the Karamu Comedies 79
  • Endnotes 97
  • Chapter 5 - The Karamu Tragedies 101
  • Endnotes 114
  • Additional Info *
  • Chapter 6 - The Harlem Suitcase Theatre 117
  • Endnotes 136
  • Chapter 7 - Community Theatre, Black Iconography, and World War II 141
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 165
  • Notes 170
  • Afterword 173
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 181
  • About the Author *
  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies *
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