Ibsen and Early Modernist Theatre, 1890-1900

By Kirsten Shepherd-Barr | Go to book overview

Preface

Arthur Symons poem ' Nora on the Pavement' features one of Ibsen's bestknown heroines and is written in a style that consciously emulates French Symbolism. Symons envisions the moment after the door has slammed at the end of A Doll's House--an action that still resonated with him in 1895, and with audiences throughout Europe--and the image of Nora standing alone on the pavement outside, overwhelmed by her sudden sense of freedom, is surcharged with the symbolist motif of the dance. 1 This English poem, written in the 1890s, thus reflects the interplay of ideas and cultures that was characteristic of early modernism; it also reflects two of the decade's most disturbing outside influences on a society in deep crisis and transition. Like Symons's poem, this book attempts to synthesize several of these important influences. It takes Ibsen's breakthrough in England and France as a case study in theatrical historiography, exploring issues of cross-cultural understanding and early modernist ideas about art, literature, and language as reflected in productions of Ibsen's plays and their reception during the first few years of the fin de siècle.

Ibsen never saw England, and his only experience of France was a two-week stay in Paris in 1868 at the age of forty, a visit of which we know next to nothing, since he characteristically left no record of his impressions. Since he knew very little English and less French, his only real contact with the literature and ideas of these countries came through translations of major texts and, more importantly, through a few close contemporaries like the influential Danish critic Georg Brandes. In turn, the introduction of his work to these two countries relied almost entirely on intermediaries and interpreters, providing extraordinarily rich material for the theatre historian engaged in the challenge of recon

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ibsen and Early Modernist Theatre, 1890-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.