Ibsen and Early Modernist Theatre, 1890-1900

By Kirsten Shepherd-Barr | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank a number of people for their help, support, and encouragement throughout the process of writing this book; it could not have been written without them. My Oxford supervisor, Christopher Butler, has been an especially generous and supportive guide, both during and since my time there. I also want to thank others who have read my work in various stages and provided invaluable help: Dr. Kate Flint, Dr. Sos Eltis, Professor Jean-Michel Rabaté, Dr. John Kelly, Dr. John Stokes, Professor Lawrence Danson, and Dr. Valérie Cossy. I am grateful to Professor Inga-Stina Ewbank for giving me the chance to present an early part of this work at an international seminar on Anglo- Scandinavian Cross-Currents in September 1994. My warm thanks to Professor Jacques Guicharnaud for many stimulating discussions on modern drama, to Lisbeth Shepherd for her help with translating, to Professor Cary Mazer for guidance and advice, and to Julian Schlusberg for inspiring me to work on theatre in the first place.

I am extremely grateful to St. Cross College, Oxford, for helping to support me financially during the initial research and writing of this book through the granting of a Paula Soans O'Brian scholarship; I have also been helped by various smaller grants in aid of research including the Una Ellis-Fermor Memorial Research Award and travel stipends from the Meyerstein Fund and the Committee for Graduate Studies of the University of Oxford. Many thanks also to the librarians and staff of the following institutions: the British Library, London; the Bibliothèque de l'Arsenal, Paris; the Royal Library, Copenhagen; the Taylorian and Bodleian libraries, Oxford; and the University Library, Oslo.

My family has been the greatest support of all, and this book is for them. My

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